Monthly Archives:June 2012

The Neneko Interview

29 Jun , 2012,
Crimson
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Taiwanese cosplay girl Neneko will be gracing the parade as it’s guest-of-honor, and thanks to the good folks at COSMO, our team managed to sneak in an interview with her despite her busy schedule.

In today’s article, we get up close with Taiwanese cosplay sensation Neneko.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ll know that Neneko burst into the international scene in a big way with her portrayal of Ahri, the 9 Tails Fox from League of Legends.

She’s also a household name in her home country, having portrayed characters otakus would die for, such as Yui from K-On! and Tsukihi from Nisemonogatari.

What’s more, this 16-year-old packs close to four years of cosplay experience under her belt, making her one of the world’s most prolific cosplayers her age.

In this interview, she shares her thoughts on being a cosplay celebrity with us.


Crimson: Hi, Neneko. Welcome to Singapore. How do you feel about being COSMO Youth Parade’s cosplay ambassador, and what’s your first impression of the local cosplay scene?

Neneko (in mandarin): Coming here’s a brand new experience for me. I’ve also heard good things about the scene here and I’m definitely looking forward to tomorrow.

Neneko’s Ahri cosplay.
Replicated from Neneko’s Official Facebook Page.
Photo used with permission.

Crimson: Many fans here are excited to know why you decided to cosplay Ahri from League of Legends (LOL). What inspired you to choose her, of all characters? 

Neneko (in mandarin): I find fox-like characters appealing. A while ago, I did a character from a Japanese visual novel with similar traits, and when I saw Ahri’s character design, I was hooked. She’s very sensual, and her abilities and characteristics are also very unique.

Crimson: Sounds like you know quite a bit about Ahri. Does that mean you play League of Legends too? 

Neneko (in mandarin): Yes. I play a lot of games in my free time.

Crimson: So we can expect more game related costumes in the future?

Neneko (in mandarin): I think that really depends on the overall difficulty of the costume. Game costumes, especially armor, can be time consuming to create.

Crimson: Let’s talk a little bit about Taiwan. What’s cosplay like over there? Is it very competitive? 

Neneko (in mandarin): The cosplay scene in Taiwan is booming right now. There are a lot more events, and increasingly, more Taiwanese cosplayers are interested in showcasing their talents on the wor,d stage. There’s bound to be competition, but I think it’s healthy competition. It’s definitely not as competitive as it is in China, Japan or Hong Kong. We’re all just hoping to put Taiwan on the world map.

Crimson: Do you tailor your costumes, or do you make them yourself?

Neneko (in mandarin): I used to just commission them, but now I sew my own costumes. It’s actually a lot more economical… I also make my own props and armor out of foam. It’s a very flexible material… You feel a great sense of satisfaction you’re done. When you create your own costumes, you don’t just learn and improve from the experience. Any money you save by doing it yourself can be used to fund your next cosplay.

Nothing like having a chat over tea and crumpets. XD

Crimson: Do you have a dream cosplay?

Neneko (in mandarin): Yes, I want to do a character from Queen’s Blade. While the costumes are very provocative and revealing, the details and props are quite detailed and complex.

Crimson: Which character did you have in mind?  

Neneko (in mandarin): I’d like to cosplay Aldra, the Bewitched Queen. I think she’d be a fun and challenging character to attempt.

Crimson: And finally, do you have anything you’d like to say to your fans here? 

Neneko (in mandarin): Ummm… Singapore seems like a friendly place. I feel very welcome and excited to be here. I hope to meet everyone tomorrow!


Neneko’s maturity and versatility sure shines through during the interview.

If you’d like to catch a glimpse of her tomorrow, be sure to drop by the parade at Ngee Ann City Civic Plaza for her meet-and-greet sessions at 2 pm and 4 pm!

Limited edition DVDs and A4 sized prints of Nenek/’s cosplay will be on sale (priced at $15 and $10 respectively), and each purchase entitles you to an autograph, handshake, photo op with this teen cosplay star.

For more details about COSMO Youth Parade, check out their website at http://www.mascotparade.org. Also, be sure to ‘Like’ the official COSMO Youth Parade Facebook page for the latest news and updates!

Cosplay: When it makes cents

27 Jun , 2012,
Crimson
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We’re talking about dollars and cents here.

Recently, our friend Kaika made a compelling case against cosplayer exploitation on her blog, ‘The Cosplay Chronicles‘, and it echoes many of our sentiments about the sordid state of affairs on this little red dot.

All too often, commercial entities attempt to inveigle cosplayers, especially novices fresh to the scene, into working gigs that have little or no relation to cosplay,  minimal publicity (in fact, cosplayers are the publicity), and generally no community value.

Kaika’s already discussed why you, as a cosplayer, should be paid, so we’re not going to delve into that. We’re going to delve instead into how much you should be paid, and why you, as a cosplayer, have the right to negotiate.

Let’s face it. The value of cosplay as a marketing tool has grown exponentially over the years.

With the sudden explosion of pop-culture into the public consciousness in the past 5 years, it’s become increasingly apparent to corporations that there’s money in cosplay.

There are a multitude of road shows, trade fairs and retail events out there that tap on the pop-culture demographic. If you want to sell geeks your goods, you’ve got to give them what they want, so to speak. It’s also no secret that Singaporeans are drawn to spectacle, and cosplay is spectacle, no?

Parade an EVA, Gundam, or hell, a guy in a full suit of armor down Orchard Road, and you’re bound to turn heads, that’s for sure.

So what does this mean? It means that cosplayers have value.

Whether you’re distributing flyers, generating what marketers call ‘eyeballs’, or even making up the numbers for a street parade, you’re generating income and publicity for corporations worth thousands (sometimes more).

The thrust here, cosplay friends, is to understand that.

It’s easy for a company to use honeyed words like “promoting Japanese culture”, “expanding your portfolio”, or even “showcasing your talent” to reel you in, but is it really?

Are you gaining any tangible benefits from sweating it out in the hot sun, indulging the public and doing your part for days on end, and all for a measly shopping voucher that can be used only at a selected mall and a certificate of participation? I think not.

Sure, cosplayers aren’t paid models, but the concept of remuneration, of reimbursement for your time, travel and laundry expenses shouldn’t be alien to you.

If pop-culture’s being commercialized, then it’s only natural that you, as cosplayers, should learn to monetize your hobby, no?

So yeah. We’ve been rambling a little bit, but the bottom-line is, all companies have money. They would have folded otherwise.

It’s just a matter of you pushing the right buttons and getting past their “No budget” spiel to ensure that you’re given a fair deal when they tap on your unique qualities and talents.

Here’s an example. One of our friends was recently offered $90 to make an appearance in a robot suit at an upcoming event, when the going rate for everyone else is $20 (several others were offered $60 for armor appearances).

Said friend turned down the offer as a matter of principle, but that goes to show how some stakeholders can and will pay, if they need you desperately enough.

And one way to get them to pay is to standardize rates across the board. Consider a minimum sum per appearance, say maybe $30 per hour if you’re wearing a less elaborate costume, and maybe $50 per hour if you’re in armor or clad in a robot suit.

If every cosplayer’s making the same demands, then sooner or later, corporations are going to have to wise up, or hire models who masquerade as cosplayers  (as if that’s not already happening), put them in tacky costumes, and pay an even bigger premium.

It might sound idealistic, but hey, it’s one way to ensure that you’re not being gypped, and that you’re not being worked to the bone for scraps, right?

Think about it, and if you agree with us, tell your cosplay friends, spread the word.

It’s time us cosplayers stood together and made a stand.


Vote for us in Singapore Blog Awards 2012!

If you liked this post, and you think we can make a difference in the Singapore cosplay scene, please do vote for us in the Singapore Blog Awards!

Your continued support will go a long way towards helping us realize this and our win would provide us with a platform to push for more ethical treatment of cosplayers.

You can do so simply by clicking on the ‘Vote For Me’ button, or on this link now.

Steampunk Vocaloid Headphones

26 Jun , 2012,
Crimson
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Awhile ago, we showed you how to build steampunk goggles on the cheap. Today, we’re going to take steampunk a step further by building a pair of headphones; not just any headphones, but a pair inspired by Vocaloid.

This tutorial will take approximately 60 minutes to complete.

Stuff you’ll need:

1. A pair of old headphones

2. Some mounting board or card stock

3. Sink stoppers

4. Gears (you can get some from model kits or old clocks)

5. Metal scraps

Of course, you’ll also need contact glue, some craft wire, white glue for priming, paint and lacquer for the finish.

Step 1:

Carefully strip away the wires and electronic components from your headphones until only the base structure is left.

What you want is a bare bones setup for you to modify, like so. XD

Step 2:

Next, using sink stoppers, create two ear pieces.

You’ll be surprised just how useful this innocuous bit of kitchenware can be.

First, apply some contact glue to the back of the sink stopper to get it ready for pasting.

Next, pass craft wire through the spokes in the sink stopper, and secure the sink stopper to the headphones base structure.

Craft wire’s great for securing the sink stopper to your base structure.

You’ll end up with something that looks kinda like this.

Step 3:

Using some pencil and paper, draw a cluster of gears onto mounting board or card stock. Next, cut out the shapes carefully with an X-Acto knife. You’ll end up with two sets (one for either ear).

These are essentially embellishments for your headphones, so be as creative as you like. Be sure to paint them a steampunk-y shade too! Bronze or chrome gold is usually a good choice.

Be careful! Those X-Acto’s are sharp!

In our case, we’re cre!ting steampunk ‘wings’ for our headphones. ^_^;;

Paint those wings a golden shade! ^_^

Step 4:

It’s time to put everything together.

First, stick on gears and metal bits to your headphones using contact glue. These lend detail to your headphones, andkgive it a more steampunk-y feel.

We used some metal scraps and gems we had lying around, but you can use anything, really! XD

Complete the look by pasting on the ‘wings’ (you’ll want to tuck these behind the sink stoppers), and decorating them with more gears.

steampunk headphones, vocaloid steampunk, steampunk vocaloid headphones, steampunk luka, megurine luka steampunk, steampunk vocaloids, steampunk, headphones, cosplay, vocaloid cosplay

And we’re done! Steampunk Vocaloid Headphones!


Vote for us in Singapore Blog Awards 2012!

If you liked this cosplay tutorial, and the many other guides and tutorials on our blog, please do vote for us in the Singapore Blog Awards!

We’re dedicated to creating more quality cosplay and pop-culture related content, and your continued support will go a long way towards helping us realize this.

You can do so simply by clicking on the Vote icon, or on this link now.

Doing A Little Good: Charity Cosplay Walk for Make-A-Wish Foundation

24 Jun , 2012,
Crimson
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We’ve witnessed the transformative power of cosplay and pop-culture firsthand, and we know that it’s empowering. We understand that it’s capable of propagating change and dramatically improving the lives of those it touches, and that’s why the team here at The Neo Tokyo Project is committed to cosplaying for social causes.

Most recently, together with our friends from Project Zen, we adopted Make-A-Wish Foundation as our preferred charity, and donned our costumes for their flag day yesterday.

Make-A-Wish Foundation is a charity that grants the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions, and as cosplayers, we figured we could help do our part by going the distance and doing what we did best – walking the walk in costume together with Make-A-Wish Foundation volunteers, and posing for pictures with donors along Orchard Road (troopers from the 501st Legion Singapore Garrison were doing the same in Newton).

It was four hours well spent, and it was really heartening to know that our presence made a real difference. It’s positive affirmation that cosplayers can give back to society in our own unique way, and motivation for us to be more socially active and to do even better next year.

Here’s a video interview with Crimson after the Charity Cosplay Walk:

Project Zen also produced a video about the charity cosplay walk, so check it out below:

And finally, here are some photos from the event, courtesy of our friend Darkon Lore (additional photos on Facebook):


Vote for us in Singapore Blog Awards 2012!

If you liked this cosplay tutorial, and the many other guides and tutorials on our blog, please do vote for us in the Singapore Blog Awards!

We’re dedicated to creating more quality cosplay and pop-culture related content, and your continued support will go a long way towards helping us realize this.

You can do so simply by clicking on the Vote icon, or on this link now.

A Convention Kit Bag

20 Jun , 2012,
Crimson
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Say you’re on location at a photo shoot, or you’re on the show floor, and suddenly there’s a costume malfunction.

A strap might break, a bit of armor snap off, or an enthusiastic fan might glomp you a little too hard and accidentally something.

We’ve experienced it all before, and that’s why it pays to pack a convention kit bag.

What’s a convention kit bag?

It’s a stash of tools for con emergencies,  and a great help when you need to jury rig your props and costumes at a con. With these tools at your disposal, you’ll also be able to craft on the go, so that’s kinda handy, right?

Just some of the tools you should be packing for a con. XD

Here’s what we usually have in ours:

1. Cutting Tools

We usually pack a pair of craft scissors and a craft knife. They’re useful for practically any situation, from cutting tape and string to bits of material you might use for patching up all that battle damage.

2. Adhesive Tape

Remember how MacGyver used to save the day with duct tape? Duct tape’s certainly saved ours on more than one occasion too. That’s why we keep a roll of it in our kit bag, together with a roll of double-sided tape and masking tape.

Tape’s great for on the spot repairs, especially if you need to secure two pieces of armor or broken straps together. You can use it on cloth too, just as long as you paste it on the inside!

3. Glue

We usually carry a tube of UHU POR and Magic Nails for fixing prop damage. The’re both foam safe, so they’re great for items you might have crafted out of compressed or expanding foam.

We also keep a bit of contact glue on hand for armor repairs.  Bits of blue foam coming lose due to wear and tear? That’s when contact glue comes in. It’s also a general purpose adhesive that bonds most prop and armor making materials.

You’ll want to keep liquid adhesives wrapped up and tightly sealed in a Ziploc bag though. You don’t want any spills, that’s for sure.

4. For clothies

Cloth costumes also see their fair share of wardrobe malfunctions too (though not always in that regard). That’s why we tend to carry an arsenal of useful items to take care of problems like ripped seams, tears, and other surprises that might pop up along the way.

The humble office stapler, for example, is excellent for fixing cloth costumes, especially if you’re in a hurry. We’ve used it to bridge rips and tears before, and it bears up to scrutiny pretty well from a distance. Just be careful about using it on fabric with loose fibers, as those don’t staple all that well.

You could also do the same with safety pins (we usually pack about a dozen), which are great for tacking down loose fabric, and keeping things like capes secure, and you definitely can’t ever go wrong with a spool of thread and a sewing needle.

We keep thread in several colors (typically white, black and skin tones) in our kit bag, in case we develop any holes or runs in our base suits too.

5. Rations

It’s funny if you think about it, but rations like an energy bar and bottled water aren’t exactly tools, right? But take it from us, we’ve discovered that even if your costume weathers the con well, fatigue and exhaustion can get to you if you’re on your feet all day, and that would mean you can’t give your all when you’re trying to portray that awesome character you’ve worked so hard for.

It’s especially true since cosplayers (us included) tend to stay awake for hours on end, doing last minute touch-ups and repairs (or just struggling to finish that costume) just before a con.

Getting a bite or two in, and some fluids in your system every now and then will definitely keep you on your feet, at least until the day’s done (just think of it as ‘repairing’ your body).

How ’bout you, cosplay friends?

Do you carry kit bags around to conventions too? What do you pack in them? We’d love to hear how that figures.

See you at the con! Cheerio!


Vote for us in Singapore Blog Awards 2012!

If you liked this cosplay tutorial, and the many other guides and tutorials on our blog, please do vote for us in the Singapore Blog Awards!

We’re dedicated to creating more quality cosplay and pop-culture related content, and your continued support will go a long way towards helping us realize this.

You can do so simply by clicking on the Vote icon, or on this link now.

Crafting a Gauntlet: Part II

17 Jun , 2012,
Crimson
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In our previous entry, we showed you how to create a simple gauntlet base out of blue foam and a cheap pair of gloves.

Today, we’ll complete the project by building a simple bracer and armor plates to affect the Saber look.

This tutorial will take approximately 45 minutes to complete.

Stuff you’ll need:

1. Some blue foam

2. A concealed jacket zipper (you can get this from most tailoring supply stores)

3. Contact glue

4. Paper fasteners

Of course, you’ll also need some white glue for priming, paint and lacquer for the finish.

Step 1:

Cut out a trapezium shaped piece of foam. Because Saber’s gauntlet is flared at the top, make sure that one side is wider than the other.

Cut along the scour lines to create a trapezium.

We used the following measurements – height: 9″ tall, base: 8″ wide, flare: 12″ wide, but you should scale it to the size of your forearm.

Step 2:

Now, affix either side of the concealed jacket zipper to the slanted edges of the trapezium using contact glue. Once it has dried, join both zipper halves together and zip it up. You’ll end up with a flared tube.

Now, trim the tube down to shape, and add on the necessary detailing by cutting out two thin strips of foam and pasting it on with contact glue.

You’ll end up with something like this.

And this is how it looks like when it’s worn. ^_^

 Step 3:

Now that we’ve got both the gauntlet base and bracer done, we’re going to work on the armor plates.

Cut out four pieces of blue foam. They should be trapezium shaped, but the slant of the sides should be less pronounced than when you were making the bracer.

Make sure they’re about the same size too.

Using contact glue, paste the armor plates together, overlapping them slightly at the edges.

Next, drive paper fasteners through the foam to create the ‘rivets’. Make sure you secure the paper fasteners in place!

Paper fasteners are great for detailing! ^_^

It should look like something this on the inside.

 Step 4:

Affix the row of overlapping armor plates onto the bracer using contact glue, and hold it in place till it sets.

Next, put on the gauntlet base and bracer, and paste the extruding armor plate onto the back of your palm.

You’re almost done!

Here’s a look at it from another angle. XD

And that’s it for Saber’s gauntlet. All that’s left to do is to prime it with white glue, spray on a nice coat of metallic silver and lacquer, and you’re done.

Of course, we didn’t just settle for Saber’s gauntlet.

We decided we could afford to give it some extra details and a midnight purple paint job so it’d suit Saber Alter (Crimson’s favorite Saber) better! XD

We <3 Saber Alter! ^^;;

Wearing the gauntlet:

If you haven’t worn armor before, you might find putting on the gauntlet a little confusing.

It’s actually really easy though, and all you need to do is to pull on the glove, wrap the curves of the bracer around your forearm, and pull up the zip!

You can also do this in reverse order to quickly and easily remove the gauntlet.


Vote for us in Singapore Blog Awards 2012!

If you liked this cosplay tutorial, and the many other guides and tutorials on our blog, please do vote for us in the Singapore Blog Awards!

We’re dedicated to creating more quality cosplay and pop-culture related content, and your continued support will go a long way towards helping us realize this.

You can do so simply by clicking on the Vote icon, or on this link now.

Crafting a Gauntlet: Part I

16 Jun , 2012,
Crimson
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With Fate being such a popular series, it’s inevitable that someone would pop the question – how exactly do you make Saber’s gauntlets? In today’s tutorial, we’ll attempt to answer that question.

Here’s a reference pic! XD

Saber’s gauntlet is actually pretty generic. It’s fairly reminiscent of plate gauntlets popularized by knightly fiction and fantasy stories, and that’s exactly why crafting one’s pretty easy.

This tutorial will take approximately 45 minutes to complete.

Stuff you’ll need:

1. Some blue foam

2. A black glove that extends up to the elbow (cheap ones from Daiso will do)

3. Contact glue

A pair of cheap gloves, some foam, and frills. That’s all you really need! ^_^

Step 1:

Let’s get started with the gauntlet base. We’ll begin with the finger guards first. Cut out some scale-shaped pieces of blue foam.

It should look kinda like this.

These scales should conform to about the size of your finger joints (you’ll need to trim them down to size). You’ll need 5 slightly longer ones, 5 not so long ones, 4 short ones, and 1 single large one (you’ll use this for something else later).

You’ll end up with 15 pieces, like so.

Don’t forget to make angled cuts along the edges of the wedges so they plane inwards!

Step 2:

Next, we’ll paste on the scales to create the finished gauntlet base.

Pull on your glove, and while wearing it, paste each scale on one at a time using contact glue.

Hold the scale in place until the glue sets. In all, you will be using 2 pieces for the thumb, and 3 pieces for each of the other fingers.

This could take a little while, so be patient!

When you’re done, you’ll end up with something like this.

Your basic gauntlet structure, done.

Step 3:

Now for a bit of detailing. You should have the one large foam scale left. Cut this foam scale up into 4 evenly sized strips, and paste this onto the knuckles area of your gauntlet.

It’s shaping up pretty nicely now, isn’t it?

And we’re essentially done with Saber’s gauntlet base!

You can use these easy steps to create any kind of gauntlet you want (since most gauntlets look the same). It’s all a matter of fleshing out the gauntlet base with additional detailing.

We’re gonna take a little break for now, cosplay friends, but be sure to check back over the weekend! We’ll be completing Saber’s gauntlet then, and you can be sure we’ll be posting a Part II really soon!


Vote for us in Singapore Blog Awards 2012!

If you liked this cosplay tutorial, and the many other guides and tutorials on our blog, please do vote for us in the Singapore Blog Awards!

We’re dedicated to creating more quality cosplay and pop-culture related content, and your continued support will go a long way towards helping us realize this.

You can do so simply by clicking on the Vote icon, or on this link now.

STGCC 2012's Cosplay Stars Announced

13 Jun , 2012,
Crimson
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Singapore’s sure turning into a cosplay hot spot, considering how con-goers here have been wowed by a string of cosplay stars in the past six months.

Singapore Toy, Games and Comic Convention (STGCC) just added two more big names to that list, when they announced Touya Hibiki and Kousaka Yun as this year’s cosplay stars.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ll know that Touya Hibiki’s one of Japan’s most prolific female-to-male crossplayers, and her portrayal of bishies from anime and manga is legendary.

She’s done characters like Tokiya from Utapri, the Vocaloid Kaito, Alto from Macross Frontier, and Shiraishi from Tenipuri, and as a regular face at Mikupa, Comiket and other Japanese pop-culture events, it’s no wonder she’s so incredibly popular.

Touya Hibiki – as Shiraishi from Prince of Tennis (U-17 Camp ver.) Photo courtesy of STGCC. Used with permission.

Kousaka Yun is a name synonymous with moe, with her claim to fame being her depiction of sweet, innocent characters such as Kobato (Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai), Kagura (Gintama), Ranka Lee (Macross Frontier) and Madoka (Puella Magi Madoka Magica). 

Kousaka Yun – as Madoka from Puella Magi Madoka Magica.
Photo courtesy of STGCC. Used with permission.

She’s also a pretty big Vocaloid cosplayer, and since she’s cosplayed with Touya Hibiki before, you can expect the two of them to pull off some great themed cosplays together at STGCC.

Of course, on top of cosplayers, STGCC also promises plenty for fans of Japanese music. MONOMIND, famed for it’s rendition of Touhou tunes, will be performing at the event, and what’s more, MONOMIND’s DJ haLRu will be squaring off against DJ Zanio from ZANEEDS, who will be returning this year, in a musical showdown that will determine, once and for all, which fandom rocks more!

MONOMIND – Coming to an STGCC near you.
Photo courtesy of STGCC. Used with permission.

Also, who can forget Cosplay @ STGCC? Last year, STGCC’s cosplay competition saw multiple contestants from around the region vying to be top dog on stage, but this year, they’ve decided to do away with the competitive angle, and to open the floor to 50 runway participants to showcase the very best of East and West.

Cosplay @ STGCC – Cosplay Runway Promo Art

Sign-ups are now live, and you can register now by downloading and filling in a simple form off the STGCC official site, so check it out!

We know for a fact that our team’s gonna be there for sure, so see you on the catwalk!

STGCC 2012 takes place 1-2 September 2012 at the Sands Expo and Convention Center, Marina Bay Sands, Singapore.

For more information, visit www.singaporetgcc.com.

ACM Thailand (in Singapore)

12 Jun , 2012,
Crimson
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Asia Cosplay Meet (ACM) Thailand took place at Funan DigitaLife Mall last weekend, with a spectacular line-up of  performances by some 15 cosplayers from the ‘Land of Smiles’, vying for the right to represent their country in the ACM Finals.

Organized by Singapore Cosplay Club, the two-day event was also graced by Yuegene Fay, a celebrated cosplayer who’s made waves across Asia and won over fans with the superb quality of her work.

Our media team was there on both days, and we were wowed by both the solo acts on Day 1, and team acts on Day 2, which ran the gamut of mainstream titles like Naruto and Macross Frontier,  to Castlevania: Judgment and Blassreiter.

While the competition was certainly the main event, there were also fringe activities that included prop-making classes by reputable Thai cosplay group C4 Team, a gothic lolita panel, a photo booth, and vendors from Funan DigitaLife Mall selling a variety of collectibles, toys and cosplay related merchandise for the casual crowd.

When the scores were finally tallied, C4 Team took home the prize, and were crowned champions of ACM Thailand, thanks to their ornate costumes and elaborate stage sets (which included a tricked out ‘motorcycle’ and plenty of LEDs all round).

Check out the videos of ACM Thailand (taken by our video partners at Operation P.Ani.C) below.


ACM Thailand 2012 Solo Performances:


ACM Thailand 2012 Group Performances:

Also, be sure to keep an eye out on our Facebook page for photos from the event!

Until next time, cheerio!

Chalking a Wig

7 Jun , 2012,
Crimson
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Recently, our part-time warrior Angelus decided she wanted to cosplay Grace from Soulfire, but when we started dissecting the character, we were at a loss. The costume was easy enough, but there were simply too many shades in Grace’s wig, and that meant we had to figure out a way to dye it by hand.

Grace, from Aspen’s Soulfire – Issue 9 Cover Art.

After messing around with several different methods, we discovered a relatively fuss-free way, and that’s what we’re going to share with you, our cosplay friends, in today’s crafting tutorial.

This tutorial will take approximately 45 minutes to complete.

Stuff you’ll need:

1. A heat resistant wig or extensions (this method only works if your wig/extensions are heat resistant, so take note!)

2. Pastel chalk (available from Art Friend)

3. Some paper towels

4. An iron with an adjustable heat setting (or a hair curler/straightener if you don’t have an iron).

5. Hair spray for use as a fixer.

Note: We can’t stress enough that this method only works with heat resistant wigs.

Also, if you’re chalking an entire wig like we did, we’d suggest using a light base shade. It’s the most optimal since the colors will bind easier, and you can almost always guarantee the look you want in your end result.

(For the purpose of this tutorial, we’re using an ice-white heat resistant extension as an example).

Step 1:

Wet your wig/extension with a bit of water. Make sure it’s damp, but not soaked all the way through.

Be sure you don’t overdo it with the water! XD

Step 2:

Next, you can start chalking it up!  Apply swathes of color in a single forward rubbing motion. Be sure to go in one direction (and only one direction) so the chalk’s applied evenly and doesn’t flake too badly.

Rub it in with broad strokes!

You can chalk on as many colors as you want!

Step 3:

Now, place the chalked wig/extension on some paper towels, and pat dry.

Be sure to pat dry your wig/extension first.

Next, wrap your wig/extensions in more paper towels. Make sure none of the wig strands are directly exposed, because you sure won’t want them to come into direct contact with your heat source!

Be sure to cover the entire wig/extension with paper towels before the next step! XD

Step 4:

Put on your iron to it’s lowest heat setting (if you don’t have an iron, you can use either a curler or straightener). Apply heat by gently ironing the wig/extension. Go in the same direction as you did when you chalked it up.

Be firm, but don’t apply too much heat or pressure. ^^;;

Heat will lock the color in place when the water on the wig/extension surface evaporates.

Heat locks those colors in place. XD

Finally, apply a liberal dusting of hair spray (it’s a great fixative), style as necessary, and voila! You’re done!

 


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