How to prime your armor

20 Apr , 2013,
Crimson
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Blue EVA’s really great for making fantasy armor, but achieving the fantasy look and affecting the feel of  metal, scales or stone can be tricky, especially for novice crafters and first-time foam builders.

As we’ve discovered, one way to enhance the illusion is priming, which not only minimizes the pores on your EVA and evens out the surfaces for paint, but also, depending on what you use, creates some really good textures.

Crimson put together this simple tutorial demystifies the priming process. Hope it helps! ^_^

IMG_6218

White glue dries smooth and clear. Here’s how three coats of white glue looks like.

What you’ll need:

1. PVA glue (Elmer’s Glue-All or white school glue)

2. A container

3. A soft brush (you can use your fingers too!)

Step 1:

Pour PVA glue into a container. And whatever you do, DON’T ever add water. Diluting PVA glue with water creates air bubbles, which may affect your finish. ^_^;;

IMG_6208

PVA glue’s our all-purpose primer!

Step 2:

Using a soft bristle brush, apply PVA glue liberally to your armor.

Make sure you cover all exposed surfaces!

Make sure you cover all exposed surfaces!

Don’t be afraid to lay it on thick. Pay attention especially to gaps and furrows, and places where the edging and filigree are joined to the base shape.

Step 3:

Let the glue dryYou can accelerate the drying by placing your armor pieces near a fan or window.

You can repeat Step 2 and Step 3  as many times as you like. Each additional coat of white glue enhances the smoothness of your finish.

We typically use three coats on our armor pieces.

Tip: 

To create bone or hide armor, consider using contact glue (yellow shoe glue). Contact glue dries rough and can simulate fibers, which creates a more organic effect.

For stone or lava, you can mix acrylic paints into white glue, which results in a crackled finish when it dries fully.

When contact glue dries, it creates a rough, leathery finish. Apply multiple layers with surface run-off to create more organic textures!

When contact glue dries, it creates a rough, leathery finish. Apply multiple layers with surface run-off to create more organic textures!